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FETCH NEXT FROM cur Vendor INTO @Vendor ID, @Vendor Name END CLOSE cur Vendor DEALLOCATE cur Vendor Kalman Toth - Database, Data Warehouse & Business Intelligence Architect SQLUSA: The Best SQL Server 2005 Training in the World! Follow this pattern: SET NOCOUNT ON DECLARE @Vendor ID int, @Vendor Name nvarchar(50), @message varchar(80), @product nvarchar(50) PRINT '-------- Vendor Products Report --------' DECLARE cur Vendor CURSOR FOR SELECT Vendor ID, Name FROM Purchasing.

Vendor WHERE Preferred Vendor Status = 1 ORDER BY Vendor ID OPEN cur Vendor FETCH NEXT FROM cur Vendor INTO @Vendor ID, @Vendor Name WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0 BEGIN PRINT ' ' SELECT @message = '----- Products From Vendor: ' @Vendor Name PRINT @message -- DO PROCESSING HERE -- Get the next vendor.

Read on for the results and a couple of suprises thrown in. Fortunately one of the applications I work with has a 13 million row lookup table that I frequently use for this type of activity. The structure looks like this: There is a unique index on RATE_PFX, RATE_ID, ZIP_AREA and EFF_DT. My tests consisted of looping through a subset of approximately 1,000 rows in the middle of the table.

Basically I was asking the table for all rates for a given RATE_PFX and RATE_ID.

In named notation, each argument's name is specified using to separate it from the argument expression.Follow this pattern: SET NOCOUNT ON DECLARE @Vendor ID int, @Vendor Name nvarchar(50), @message varchar(80), @product nvarchar(50) PRINT '-------- Vendor Products Report --------' DECLARE cur Vendor CURSOR FOR SELECT Vendor ID, Name FROM Purchasing.Vendor WHERE Preferred Vendor Status = 1 ORDER BY Vendor ID OPEN cur Vendor FETCH NEXT FROM cur Vendor INTO @Vendor ID, @Vendor Name WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0 BEGIN PRINT ' ' SELECT @message = '----- Products From Vendor: ' @Vendor Name PRINT @message -- DO PROCESSING HERE -- Get the next vendor.I didn't use any performance metric other than execution time to evaluate the results. My first test compared a single SELECT statement to a cursor to determine the count of records and the sum of the rates. As you can see both the SELECT statement and the cursor sum amounts and count the records.My test server was an empty dual-Pentium III 450Mhz Xeon with 2GB of RAM and a 50GB RAID array. My statement selected 873 of the records in the table. They both returned the same record count and the same total.

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